Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Guide to Common Childhood Diseases

Any concerned parent often finds themselves worrying about their child’s health. There are a lot of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and allergens that cause both infectious and non-infectious childhood diseases. Having information on how a disease presents, its likely means of transmission, and when to seek a doctor’s help may prepare you as the parent to deal with such situations. Here is a guide to some common childhood diseases.

COLD
Cold, also called common cold, is usually caused by viruses infecting the throat, nose and sinuses. Children happen to get more cold infections during the fall and winter season since the cold conditions enable the disease-causing virus to thrive. Children are affected worse than adults because they lack a strong immunity to fight off the cold viruses. It may spread through direct skin contact with an infected person or through indirect contact, which involves touching an inanimate object that may have also been contaminated by an infected person. It usually presents with a running nose, coughing, headache, mild sore throat, mild fever and fatigue. Babies under the age of 3 years that have stuffed noses tend to have difficulty breathing and feeding. It is recommended that you visit a pediatric clinic Austin when your baby has symptoms of difficulty breathing, vomiting and fever.

CROUP
Croup, also called laryngotracheobronchitis, refers to an infection that affects the vocal cords, throat and bronchial system. It is caused by several viruses that usually infect children under five years. It spreads during early spring and winter through direct contact, indirect contact and aerosol droplets. It may start like a cold with a fever and cough then proceed with reddening and swelling of the throat and larynx linings. The child’s voice develops hoarseness, and the cough may sound like a bark. Activities that elevate their breathing rate may worsen the symptoms. Normally, the disease is self-resolving. In severe situations, presenting with fever lasting more than 72 hours and bluish discoloration of lips, preferably seek the help of a doctor.

DEHYDRATION AND DIARRHEA
Diarrhea is often a mild and brief condition characterized by more than three bowel movements of stool that are watery and less well-formed in a day. Diarrhea causative agents easily spread by direct contact. Failure to properly manage it may result in your child losing water and salts, resulting in dehydration. Dehydration often presents with sunken eyes, dry skin, mouth, tongue and reduced skin turgor. It can be managed through administering oral rehydration salts as directed by a pediatrician.
Croup, cold and diarrhea are diseases that commonly spread among children. Knowing the essential facts about them may help you secure your child’s health.

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