Friday, June 23, 2017

5 Simple Steps To Help Keep Neighborhood Cats Away


You can be the biggest cat lover in the history of the world, but that doesn't mean you want all the neighborhood cats in your yard.

For as long as humans have been keeping pets and living near one another, neighbors have been prone to argue about this very issue. It's one of the reasons some people choose to keep their cats indoors, for fear of their neighbors’ reprisals.

If you have neighbors that do let their cats out to roam, then you’re entitled to feel a sense of invasion if they make their way into your living space. Not only do they have a tendency to make a mess (cats just love to dig up flower beds, it would seem!) but it’s also a potential health threat to your own cat, especially if you occasionally let them out to meander in the yard too.

So, what can you do about it?

1) Protect Your Cat First

First on the list for coping with intrusive neighborhood cats is to make sure your cat is well-protected. That means you need to look for treatments and preventative measures for all the unpleasant things that can result in two cats sharing a space. So you need to focus on flea control for cats, worming, and ensure that your furball has their FeLV vaccination up-to-date.

2) Cat Unfriendly Fences

Now you can be confident that your cat isn’t going to suffer from intrusive neighbors, you can focus on keeping the wrong ones out. The best way to do this is to make your fences difficult to climb, though this won’t entirely solve the problem - cats are geniuses when it comes to finding somewhere they want to go! Nevertheless, install trellis panels onto the top of your fences; this will make them a far less attractive proposition to climb onto.

3) Use Anti-Cat Devices

If you don’t want neighborhood cats even to make the attempt, then anti-cat devices might be of use. These electronic devices emit a noise (undetectable to human ears) that can warn cats away - sadly, the reviews of their efficacy are mixed. It’s also worth querying how your own cat might feel about being regularly exposed to such a sound.

4) Use Pheromones

Pheromones can help to warn any neighborhood cats that the area already has a cat, thank you very much, and their presence isn’t desired. There is no guarantee with this, but it might be effective if they are still trying to get their way over fences.

5) Blocking Measures

If there is a gap in the fence or a part of the wall that you have seen cats using to access your yard, then block it. Potted small ornamental trees - they don’t have to be real - are the best bet for this, especially if you spritz them with a scent (such as citrus) that cats are known to dislike.



What do you do to keep stray cats out of your yard?  Please share anything that works.

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